The Proliferation of Gay Sex Games and How They Objectify Sex

Trying to find a video game with a main character that happens to be gay is an exercise in sifting through poorly made indie games and porn on the cusp of not being banned from Steam as such. As a result, I’ve decided to pick on the latter for today, the pornographic games lazily disguised as adventure-driven plot. These are mostly confined to Steam, as that is the only platform willing to publish them on a more accessible scale. The games included here will be, Escape from Pleasure Planet, and a series of three games made by Robert Yang. Both these games and the long list of similar games reinforce the tiresome sexual objectification LGBTQ people.

I’ve had personal experience with this sexual objectification so I’ll be frank — this topic is very frustrating for me. That said, let’s start with Escape from Pleasure Planet. This is a point and click adventure where you play the part of Captain Tycho Minogue and chase down the “dangerous (and dangerously handsome) criminal to Arcadia, a tourist resort [nicknamed] Pleasure Planet.”

I’m sure you can imagine what happens in such an aptly named place as the player tries to find the criminal and uncover just what is so slightly off about the sex-centred planet. Sex, even if it’s not explicitly, is used to entice the player. In the case of this game, the tease or hint of sex is directed towards those that enjoy male/male porn.

Not all of those folks see The Gays™ as people; rather, as a group dedicated explicitly as sexual objects, and more often than not, for the pleasure of the viewer. Needless to say, the strong sexual themes in Escape from Pleasure Planet reinforces the tired notion that anything LGBTQ focused must be sexualized in video games.

Another example of this objectification is the series of games by Robert Yang. The first of this is called Hurt Me Plenty, in which the player negotiates a spanking scene, goes through with it (badly or not), and is then required to provide aftercare. There are safe words and the entire scene is consensual, but those who don’t understand may find themselves uncomfortable and not ready for the actions the game forces you to take. Indeed, you can even go beyond the line of consent and keep going after the submissive uses their safe word.

The second and third games, Succulent and Stick Shift, are visual representations of an orgasm. You can decide what kind of orgasm they each represent.

Though there might be a deeper meaning with Yang’s games, it is once again all about sex — gay sex, specifically. There are plenty of other ways to go about conveying similar themes to the player, without explicitly involving spanking, jerking off, and blow jobs. These games don’t even have the excuse of a plot that Escape from Pleasure Planet does, they are all about sex and that is it.

If these weren’t four of many video games with gay “themes” or main characters, I would write this off as “porn touches everything.” But they are not; they are beyond prolific, and for how old the video game industry is, there is no excuse for there being so little. There are least five far more meaningful and deep LGBTQ films for every one of these sex games. Again, the lack of focus on anything but sex, and sheer number of games like Escape from Pleasure Planet, Hurt Me Plenty, Succulent, and Stick Shift, allows for the sexual objectification of the LGBTQ community to be reinforced.

[irp]

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